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Thread: British military clasp knives

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    Re: British military clasp knives

    Zorro and smiling-knife,

    I got a British pattern No: 6353/1905 clasp knife today. I had a chat to Dutchy about it and verified what I purchased (maybe a bit of skyting about the price ).

    It does not have any broad arrows or numbers on the marlin spike (does that mean it was a "civie" version? or they were lazy?)

    The only markings are the makers mark

    H G LONG
    & Co
    SHEFFIELD

    I have googled H G Long and they were/are a knife maker.

    Any other info would be appreciated.
    Stewart Townsend
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    Re: British military clasp knives

    Quote Originally Posted by Stewart Townsend
    Zorro and smiling-knife,

    I got a British pattern No: 6353/1905 clasp knife today. I had a chat to Dutchy about it and verified what I purchased (maybe a bit of skyting about the price ).

    It does not have any broad arrows or numbers on the marlin spike (does that mean it was a "civie" version? or they were lazy?)

    The only markings are the makers mark

    H G LONG
    & Co
    SHEFFIELD

    I have googled H G Long and they were/are a knife maker.

    Any other info would be appreciated.
    H G Long & Co is typical of many Sheffield firms with it's roots in the early 19th century. Named for Henry Godfrey Lamb Long, who is first mentioned in Sheffield directories in 1828. After many partnerships and different names, it was finally known as H G Long & Co Ltd in 1911, and was promptly liquidated the following year. :shock:

    Joseph Allen ressurected the name in 1913, the company changed adresses several times, finishing up at the same factory as Joseph Allen & Sons in 1941.

    I have a Christopher Johnson & Co 6353/1905 that does not have any acceptance marks or date stamp, and as Dutchy says, there is some evidence that knives were issued during WW1 without any marks.
    OIL THE JOINTS

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    Re: British military clasp knives

    G'day Zorro, great thread very interesting. I have 2 questions re a Canadian issue Clasp I own.
    It's a large Military clasp which is identical to Plate 452 Flook's British and Commonwealth Knives, which I originally obtained from US....<its a massive 30cms from open blade to open marlin spike>...it bears the I*XL trademark on the blade, tang stamped George Wostenholm Sheffield England.,chequered green horn grips and bears the ^c mark on the marlin spike <the C encircles the acceptance mark>. and has the early pattern can opener which you have been discussing.
    When the can opener is opened I can see clearly stamped the number '19' <nothing else> on centre divider.
    Q1: Do you know what that number signifys?
    Flook states it is a Canadian WW1 knife and identical to Plate 304 which is a 1938 date Wade and Butcher used by the British.
    Q2oes the Canadian 'C' acceptance confirm that it is a WW1 Clasp?.....could it not have been made between both World Wars similar to the 1938 W&B stamped clasp? ....and did George Wostenholm make similar clasps for the British or exclusively for the Canadians...and possibly also the Australians?
    Interestingly I also have a 1880 Stag Handle Horsemans' implement knife with the same master blade stamping I*XL.
    Thanks for any info you can provide. Hoo Roo.

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    Super Moderator Dutchy357's Avatar
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    Re: British military clasp knives

    Geez Larry

    Is your camera broken??

    Or did you trade it in an another Metal Detector??

    Give the man some pic's. I'm hanging out to see some.

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    Re: British military clasp knives

    [quote="larry303"]G'day Zorro, great thread very interesting. I have 2 questions re a Canadian issue Clasp I own.
    It's a large Military clasp which is identical to Plate 452 Flook's British and Commonwealth Knives, which I originally obtained from US....<its a massive 30cms from open blade to open marlin spike>


    30cm!!! You are kidding...please, pics, pleeeezee
    "...I used to be indecisive, but now I don't know..."

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    Re: British military clasp knives

    Hi, this Wostenholm must be similar to your knife larry. It has the Canadain acceptance mark on the spike. I believe the 19 is the inspector's mark. It could very well be made anytime around WWI or up to WWII but I don't know forsure. This second Canadian knife made by Thomas Turner is much easier to date. M & D refers to Militia and Defense.


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    Re: British military clasp knives

    Now then Larry, glad you're enjoying the thread mate.

    S-K is spot on as usual, although these are commonly known as WW1 knives, they were made and issued right up to the eve of WW2.

    Wostenholm was one of the top quality Sheffield makers of the 19th/ early 20th centuries, and they exported lots of knives to Australia and the US. I can't say for certain that they supplied the Australian military, but I wouldn't be surprised. Be nice to see one with an Oz stamp on it.
    OIL THE JOINTS

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    Re: British military clasp knives

    Bingo!..Smiling Knife identical Clasp...it would have been quite formidable as a weapon of last resort with that vicious Marlin Spike..would it not?..30cms from tip to tip..
    I sent some photos to Dutchy he may want to show...<I am spoilt on BF as a Gold Member being able to post photos direct>
    How about offering memberships here to allow direct photo posting??..<.when they talk about lifting and pasting I still get out the Clag!>
    Many thanks for all your input....
    P.S. I have nearly the complete Whittingslowe Adelaide <WE> Product Range <Fixed blades and Clasps> I could show indue course...

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    Re: British military clasp knives

    The Navy Admiralty pattern 301 was produced with Chequered alloy scales for a while during the 30's, ( I haven't got one in my collection and I can't find an image so you will have to use your imagination. )

    It was finally replaced in the late 30's with this pattern.



    This one is a Joseph Rodgers, dated 1938.



    Still got the heavy copper shackle, but the tools are now laid out as per the Army knife, and the spike is identical.

    Before we leave the 6353/1905, here's an unusual one.



    It appears to be a 6353/1905 but it has flat fibre or pressed leather scales.



    No other marks than the maker, and the copper shackle is smaller than normal.

    So, 1939, Britain is gearing up for what's to come, and the Army gets a new smaller pattern.



    these are both Taylors Eyewitness, could have been made by the same bloke.

    OIL THE JOINTS

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    Re: British military clasp knives

    This pattern evolved over the next 5 years and was made both with and without the marlin spike.



    Top to bottom, 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945.

    By 1942, the shackle had changed to steel from copper.

    1943, the scale became one piece, doing away with the bolster.

    !945, and a bottle opener was incorporated in the tin opener.

    Although this appears to be the standard pattern, these are a few examples of flat scaled knives which were issued.



    The top one is rather unusual as far as I'm aware, scales look like pressed fibre.





    Here are three examples of a different pattern, all different makers but no issue or date stamps


    The size falls mid way between the WW1 and WW2 knives.



    Looking at the shackles and tin tin opener, these appear to have been made between 1942 and 1945.



    In 1945, an all stainless steel knife went onto production for the Pacific theatre. I have seen these described as the "Burma knife"

    Here are five examples, all dated 1945 and carrying the issue stamp.

    OIL THE JOINTS

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