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Dutchy357
09-11-2015, 23:05
Hi Guys

Here is another Clasp Knife. I have previously featured the WW1 British Admiralty pattern AP301.

For this one we move to the Second World War and a Clasp Knife that was made in Australia.

This is a type of knife that everyone who has been in the services will be familiar with. In one variation or another, I am sure that everyone has been issued with a Knives, Clasp during their Military career.

I have here the Whittingslowe Second Pattern Clasp Knife that was issued from towards the end of the Second World War and were still being issued up until the Vietnam War.

This knife was made at the Whittingslowe factory in Adelaide.

The Second Pattern Clasp Knife is also found with Carr Fast and Sterling markings. All of these knives appear to be identical in form and were most likely all made in the Whittingslowe factory. It is easy to see a link between Carr Fast and Whittingslowe because William Whittingslowe was a Director of Carr Fast before the war. Who and what the tie up with Sterling was, is a little more uncertain.

These knives are still an excellent place for a beginner to start a collection. Compared with many of the Australian made Military knives, clasp knives are relatively common and inexpensive.


http://i791.photobucket.com/albums/yy193/Dutchy357/Forums/ABF/Military%20Monday/DSC_0775_zpsxeqihwwj.jpg

http://i791.photobucket.com/albums/yy193/Dutchy357/Forums/ABF/Military%20Monday/DSC_0774_zpsnzdrxra8.jpg

http://i791.photobucket.com/albums/yy193/Dutchy357/Forums/ABF/Military%20Monday/DSC_0767b_zps1zh1a1e2.jpg


Sadly Australian Made clasp knives have not been issued to the Australian Military for some time. But I will cover those knives at a later time.


Regards Dutchy

Markus
10-11-2015, 12:34
Hi Guys

Here is another Clasp Knife. I have previously featured the WW1 British Admiralty pattern AP301.

For this one we move to the Second World War and a Clasp Knife that was made in Australia.

This is a type of knife that everyone who has been in the services will be familiar with. In one variation or another, I am sure that everyone has been issued with a Knives, Clasp during their Military career.

I have here the Whittingslowe Second Pattern Clasp Knife that was issued from towards the end of the Second World War and were still being issued up until the Vietnam War.

This knife was made at the Whittingslowe factory in Adelaide.

The Second Pattern Clasp Knife is also found with Carr Fast and Sterling markings. All of these knives appear to be identical in form and were most likely all made in the Whittingslowe factory. It is easy to see a link between Carr Fast and Whittingslowe because William Whittingslowe was a Director of Carr Fast before the war. Who and what the tie up with Sterling was, is a little more uncertain.

These knives are still an excellent place for a beginner to start a collection. Compared with many of the Australian made Military knives, clasp knives are relatively common and inexpensive.


http://i791.photobucket.com/albums/yy193/Dutchy357/Forums/ABF/Military%20Monday/DSC_0775_zpsxeqihwwj.jpg

http://i791.photobucket.com/albums/yy193/Dutchy357/Forums/ABF/Military%20Monday/DSC_0774_zpsnzdrxra8.jpg

http://i791.photobucket.com/albums/yy193/Dutchy357/Forums/ABF/Military%20Monday/DSC_0767b_zps1zh1a1e2.jpg


Sadly Australian Made clasp knives have not been issued to the Australian Military for some time. But I will cover those knives at a later time.


Regards Dutchy


Looks to be in good condition Dutchy. Congradulations. Do you know where the Adelaide factory was who made these? What is the 'spike' used for, opening cans or defense? I had a German WW11 clasp knife once, a family member acquired it! It was incredibly solid for a pocket knife!

KnifeKnut
11-11-2015, 09:05
Dutchy, can you illustrate the difference between first and second pattern clasp knives?

Also, which would you say is more commonly found?

Dutchy357
11-11-2015, 10:30
Looks to be in good condition Dutchy. Congradulations. Do you know where the Adelaide factory was who made these? What is the 'spike' used for, opening cans or defense? I had a German WW11 clasp knife once, a family member acquired it! It was incredibly solid for a pocket knife!

The Whittingslowe factory was located at 93 Port Rd Queenstown. A suburb which is near Port Adelaide. Nothing of the factory remains. Housing now occupies this location.

The spike fitted to a modern clasp knife is derived from the tool used by seamen for centuries, currently known as a marlinspike or marlin spike. It has also been known as a marline spike or the archaic marling spike.

Marline spikes are used:
As levers to open strands of laid rope when forming eyes or inserting items into the lay.
To untie knots that have tightened under tension.
As a lever or handle to tension marline or rope using a marlinspike hitch, much tighter than by gripping the line with the hand alone.

Marline is a light rope, made from hemp and usually tarred, it is made of two strands laid left-handed. It has a variety of uses including being used to bind (whipping) the end of a larger rope, to prevent fraying.

Marline spikes first appeared as an attachment to a clasp knife during the Boer War.

The original seamans marline spike is straight. The marline spike on the clasp knife is purposely bent so that the point is against the back of the spring and does not protrude to injure the carrier.

The spike was described as a "Marline Spike" in the specification for the 6353/1905 British Army Clasp knife approved by the War Office, July 1913 (Flook); KNIFE, Clasp with Marline Spike and Tin Opener.

The marline spike was also used as a hoof pick by mounted troops. As the war progressed, the issue of Knives, Clasp with marline spike was restricted to mounted troops and the knife pattern 8173/1914 that had no marline spike went to dismounted troops.

By the end of the war it appears that all Australian troops were being issued with the 6353/1905 clasp knife with marline spike.

The spike is not intended as a weapon. Neither is the clasp knife that it is affixed to.

Hope that helps!

Dutchy

Dutchy357
11-11-2015, 14:59
Dutchy, can you illustrate the difference between first and second pattern clasp knives?

Also, which would you say is more commonly found?

Hi KK

Here is a First Pattern clasp knife by Whittingslowe.

http://i791.photobucket.com/albums/yy193/Dutchy357/Forums/ABF/Military%20Monday/DSC_0779_zpssqueuilp.jpg

http://i791.photobucket.com/albums/yy193/Dutchy357/Forums/ABF/Military%20Monday/DSC_0788_zpscu03rgfr.jpg

http://i791.photobucket.com/albums/yy193/Dutchy357/Forums/ABF/Military%20Monday/DSC_0781b_zpszd6y8ec8.jpg


The most noticeable difference it the tin opener. It looks like a crab claw!

The minor differences are in the scales which are a little more pointed on top of the canoe ends. Predominantly the nail nick is found on the left hand side of the blade which makes it hard to get to when closed. The nail nick shifted to the right hand side of the blade on the second pattern which made it easier to get to.

The only markings are the pheon and the stylised WE trademark on the LHS of the tin opener.

This pattern is also found with a pheon and CARR marked on the RHS of the tin opener. As with the second pattern Carr Fast marked knife this knife is identical to the WE knife and was most likely made in the Whittingslowe factory.

The Product 24 Whittingslowe clasp knife is identical to the first pattern clasp knife. I believe that these were primarily intended for the “Private Purchase” market. Examples of the Product 24 clasp knife have turned up in the estates of former US WW2 servicemen, it is uncertain as to whether these were private purchase or unit purchases by some of the US units garrisoned in Australia during the war.

There are at least 3 other makers who made a first pattern clasp knife. They are Greg Steel, Tatham and one not marked with a makers mark and as yet unidentified.

The WE first pattern is by far the most common WW2 Australian clasp knife that is on the market. I often have a little laugh when sellers list them as rare!

Hope that is helpful.

Regards Dutchy