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Thread: Sharpening serrated and convex blades?

  1. #21
    Knifemaker Substance's Avatar
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    Yeh those are neater than my serrations of the paper wheel came out
    all over the shop like a mad woman’s crochet
    but I have not rounded a corner off either
    So that might help me
    Saved,
    to shave another day.
    www.dcblades.com

  2. #22
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    @Substance No real need to round the corners off paper wheels, I found if you do more light passes (as apposed to quick and heavy)
    you can get a pretty even finish, just use a marker pen to get your angles right from the beginning and keep the passes at a consistent speed ie fairly fast

  3. #23
    Senior Member WóđanaZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff View Post
    I have two sharpening dilemmas.

    The first is my Global breadknife is long overdue a sharpen.....but how the hell do you sharpen a serrated edge blade properly?

    Do you need a rod/steel the same dimension as the serrations, or is there another way?

    Second, my Bark River Fox River is also due a sharpen, and it’s my only convex edge knife, so what’s the best way to sharpen that?

    Oh, and if anyone can recommend a good commercial sharpening service in the Perth area, or anyone who does it as a cash hobby, I’m all ears!

    Thanks


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Serrated sharpening with very little cost and no special tools:
    https://youtu.be/R98EqfC0cWI

    —————

    Convex is best done by: (1) establishing the apex degrees you want and to simply start grinding it at that angle to establish a burr free apex*; (2) blending the shoulder and blade back into one continuous curve retaining a very uniform geometry.

    Using the natural rocking motion of the hands is best to achieve this after the apex is established. Once the apex is established don’t touch it again while you’re doing the rest of the blade. You can touch the apex again on the next grit to refine it further but be gentle or it will become obtuse. The knife should easily pushcut newsprint and shave hair off of the first grit, regardless of what grit it is.

    Note: If you only ever sharpen the apex it (transition from shoulder to apex) will become very obtuse and quite “dull” over time and thus the whole blade must be sharpened, from spine to apex/or sabre line to apex. See a Murray Carter YouTube video on this idea applied to flatgrinds and you’ll see why it’s even more relevant on convex blades.

    For an example of the rocking motion, check out the “Virtuovice” YouTube channel as he does this rocking motion correctly. He is, however - and contrary to popular opinion, a terrible sharpener and his results are piss poor for the effort he puts in.

    *To understand why burr based sharpening is impractical, wasteful and highly novice I point out a few aspects here: https://www.australianbladeforums.co...tml#post353632



    Need any further help PM me and I’ll help you through it.
    Last edited by WóđanaZ; 11-01-2019 at 11:34.

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